Posts

Today’s article is part of our series on grant writing, one area in which Tiny Frog Strategies works with organizations to get from where they are to where they want to be.

So here’s the problem: you need money for the ongoing core activities of your organization, things like paying staff, paying rent and buying toilet paper. Grant funders want to give money to activities that connect directly with your beneficiaries, like an innovative meal program or a new initiative with a local artist. You aren’t opposed to being innovative, but first you need to make sure there is toilet paper in the washroom.

Welcome to the ultimate catch 22 of being a nonprofit. The bad news is that this tension has been around for a while and is probably not going to be fixed any time soon. The good news is that your organization isn’t the only one who feels frustrated and others have managed to buy toilet paper AND try out new ways of doing things.

So let’s talk about how to deal with this problem.
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Martha (not her real name, of course) had a dream to leave a legacy. She intended that each of her four grandchildren and her favorite charity would receive a substantial benefit when her house was sold. In fact, that was the only reason she was still rattling around in the old barn. Read more

Back to basics series: this post covers the basics of legacy giving. If you’re new around here, you might find it especially helpful. Go ahead and check out #backtobasics for other articles covering key concepts.

How fundraisers talk about people who make a legacy gift:

Like every industry, fundraising is full of its own technical jargon. Here are some terms that are helpful to understand exactly what will be happening at that professional association breakfast that you are going to be attending next month. Read more

Back to basics series: this post covers the basics of legacy giving. If you’re new around here, you might find it especially helpful. Go ahead and check out back to basics for other articles covering key concepts.

Charitable gift annuities, changes to CRA guidelines, and insurance rates.

Are you feeling confused yet? Or overwhelmed? Are these terms bringing up a little bit of anxiety that you might not know enough about them? Maybe you know a little bit, but not enough to feel comfortable to speak with a DONOR about them?

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Back to basics series: this post covers the basics of legacy giving. If you’re new around here, you might find it especially helpful. Go ahead and check out back to basics for other articles covering key concepts.

So, what is legacy giving anyways? Read more

This post is part of our definitions project: a collection of fundraising industry words to help you get by. Our favourites just might be regular words that have been appropriated to have weird fundraising significance, but we’ll see.

(word)

The Ask

 (definition)

The specific moment when the fundraiser reaches out to a donor (or donors) about making a monetary donation.

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Those pesky TV ads regarding toothpaste and whiter-than-white teeth are sort of true. Even though my smile bears testimony to a lifelong addiction to Earl Grey tea and cola, I boast the whitest, brightest bristles on my toothbrush.

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Aaaah innovation! How I am coming to detest that word.

Ok, I don’t really detest innovation. But the language of innovation has been a fad in recent years, and yes, fundraising has fads, mostly involving the use of language and metrics, not colours or fabric prints.

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I had a great time at the Canadian Association of Gift Planners Conference in Toronto. (You can read what Dad had to say about it here.) I was one of four parent and child combos, where both were professionals attending the conference. That intergenerational thing appears to be catching on, which made me happy. Read more

Language is wonderful. We communicate all manner of things with the written word.

My mother once wrote a note to the school I attended to excuse my absence with the words: “Please excuse David as he had mild gastrointestinal inflammation of the lower intestinal track.” It was a stomach ache all dressed up in hospital jargon. The staff at reception passed the note around for all to read and admire.

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